April 12, 2024

The Hellenistic Period

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In Classical antiquity, the Hellenistic period covers the time in Mediterranean history after Classical Greece, between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire. The Ancient Greek word Hellas was gradually recognized as the name for Greece.

In Classical antiquity, the Hellenistic period covers the time in Mediterranean history after Classical Greece, between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire. The Ancient Greek word Hellas was gradually recognized as the name for Greece.

Hellenistic kingdoms were established throughout south-west Asia (Seleucid Empire, Kingdom of Pergamon), north-east Africa (Ptolemaic Kingdom) and South Asia (Greco-Bactrian Kingdom, Indo-Greek Kingdom).

During the Hellenistic period, Greek cultural influence and power reached its peak in the Mediterranean and beyond. The religious sphere expanded to include new gods such as the Greco-Egyptian Serapis, eastern deities such as Attis and Cybele.

Proposals as the closing event include the final conquest of the Greek heartlands by Rome in 146 BC following the Achaean War, the final defeat of the Ptolemaic Kingdom at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC.

The idea of a Hellenistic period is a 19th-century concept, and did not exist in ancient Greece. The term was coined by Johann Gustav Droysen in the mid-19th century. Hellenism has been widely used in various contexts.

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